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, president of investment timing consultants. he joins us from troy, michigan. nice to see you. back back to the program. >> thank you, tom, great to see you. >> tom: why so bearish? you describe yourself as extremely bearish? why? >> well, i'm looking at, say, the next three or four years. i think, first of all, where we are now, the combination of economic stagnation and government austerity is not really a pill for a better economy. we have shifting demographics with people-- baby boomers are getting older. housing to me doesn't look like it's fixed yet. the employment levels look like they're going to get worse, unemployment levels and we see what the fed is doing. they basically told us we're giving you a free pass on interest rates the next couple of years, that combined with what's going on in europe the last couple of days i think is a real testimony to the issues and problems going on, in a global economy. these are not things that happen when the economy is doing well. these are things that-- this continued facilitation of money and money being thrown at everything it try to fix
. i gave this speech at the speech contest down and the capital of michigan, in east lansing. it was a speech exposing the private organizations in the u.s. could still discriminate on the basis of race. this was in the early 1970's. you could still have caucasian one -- the elks club was whites only. a lot of these men's groups were whites only groups. i just thought that was wrong. so i give a speech about it. the next thing i knew, it was on the associated press and on the evening news and national networks that this 17-year-old was speaking out against racism in private clubs. and the whole thing's sort of snowballed. by the next year, there were lawsuits and bills introduced in congress. and these private groups all have to change their ways and they could no longer be whites only organizations. and that was just, i was not the only one doing this, but it was a big push that started when i gave the speech in east lansing, michigan. a dangerous lesson to teach a teenager that just by writing down three pages of paper or what i wanted to say have this impact. again, i am g
in michigan called on congress to create new jobs, while republican presidential contenders wooed voters in south carolina. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the highlights from today's events, the unofficial start of the 2012 campaign. plus, newshour political editor david chalian assesses what's at stake in the week ahead. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez examines the state of labor unions on this day honoring americans at work. >> a lot of the challenges that workers and unions are facing come from a sustained attack on workers from business and from public policy. >> in a competitive marketplace there's very little power to raise workers' wages because the companies can't pass it on to the consumers. >> brown: veteran foreign correspondent edward girardet offers personal reflections and stories from his new book on three decades of war reporting in afghanistan. >> woodruff: and we close with powerful remembrances of 9/11, from the parents, teachers, and students at an elementary school just blocks from ground zero. >> the w
. there were a lot of people not allowed to see me. the michigan department of corrections shut that down. they figured out ways to get people not to come. they told me i was not going to be treated special, so i was treated a specially bad, so i did not get the same treatment as everyone else. they were shunning people like reverend jackson and a lot of other people who attempted to come see me. they were turned away at the door. i did hear you tried to come see me, and i wish i would have had a chance to see you at that point, because when you were coming was six months after i had been there, and i had been through a time when i felt i needed to close myself in. i was tutoring people. i was in the yard every day, so i went through that solitary time and more into the rest of my life, because i started that inside. >> i could spend hours talking to you about what is in this book and other comments i have. now the rest of your life -- how do you envision the rest of your life starting with this federal trial? how does kwame kilpatrick at still such a young age see himself navigating the
happened in pennsylvania, since what happened in michigan where we've had these pipelines explode and people were killed, we have met with the gas and oil companies. we have organized so that now the gas companies will put up on their website where pipelines are. people move into neighborhoods and they have no idea a pipeline is running through their front yard. we want to get to the ideaed that somebody doesn't throw the switch in their house -- the light switch and the explosion occurs in their front yard. those kinds of safety opportunities are what we're trying to create. we have some responsibility for pipeline safety at the department of transportation. but we've given some of that responsibility over to the state. we want to work with the oil and gas companies to make sure people are aware if there is a pipeline in their front yard and to make sure that the oil and gas companies are replacing these ijing pipe leans on a regular basis so we don't have the kind of explosions that took place in san bernardino. >> thank you. >>> multitalented eed actress, singer, danner is now
and across michigan, all across the midwest, and the country. we will lot more work to do to recover fully from the recession. i am not satisfied just to get. back to where we were before the recession. we have to fully restore the middle class in america. >> joining me to discuss the busy day in politics and what we can expect from the jobs from this week is steve kingston. did we learn more about what the president is likely to say on thursday? >> we learned this campaign season already. do not believe anyone from the white house who says otherwise. that is in terms of the way he is framing the debate about jobs. he is talking about democrats standing up for the middle class and republicans defending the entrenched forces. he was to show he has the stomach and spine for a fight. he said he was not scared of tough times. he mentioned a bunch of measures seek has already talked about before by extending the payroll tax cuts, passing trade deals, spending money on roads and railways and bridges, infrastructure projects that will create construction jobs. there is nothing new there. we did g
? >> there is indeed a rebound. even though you see michigan has above average unemployment, some of the other areas of the midwest, you see unemployment near or even below the national average. that's being driven by manufacturing. >> ifill: actually something is coming back. it's just not now. other places are feeling the back wash of the same issues we've been talking about. >> that's right. >> ifill: okay. dante, the increased foreclosures, it seems to me in some way they must deal with some of the numbers we've been hearing about increased poverty. is there a connection? >> well i think that the increased foreclosures i'm not sure how much they're leading to increased poverty numbers but they're leading to the increased unemployment numbers. i think that it's hard for people to understand. foreclosures are bad in a lot of ways. they're a huge psychological factor in how you spend money. i go to these communities and visit them. you had an entire economy that was built on housing. so i did like carpent rework and somebody else did hvac work. we made a lot of money during the boom and we were tra
're watching for tomorrow: the university of michigan issues its final take on consumer sentiment for september. we'll ask legendary investor warren buffett for his take on the economy and the markets, and we wrap up wall street's third quarter with standard and poor's strategist sam stovall. he's our friday "market monitor" guest. a japanese auto supplier has agreed to plead guilty and pay a $200 million fine to settle a criminal price-fixing scam that ran partly out of detroit. the settlement was announced today by the u.s. department of justice. three furukawa executives have also agreed to plead guilty and serve prison time in the u.s. ranging from 12 to 18 months. it's the government's first charges as a result of its ongoing international investigation of price fixing in the auto parts industry. >> tom: a group of privacy advocates wants uncle sam to investigate facebook. the american civil liberties union and the electronic privacy information center are among the nine groups asking the federal trade commission to look into how the social networking giant collects data about its users' o
the united states. >> ifill: a recent string of arrests in michigan, ohio, utah and illinois captured many californians, all caught with large hauls of marijuana. >> brown: ten years later, how safe is the u.s. from terror attacks? members of one of the key investigating groups weigh in. three years after the terror attacks on new york and washington. the 9/11 commission issued a report that looked back with a dramatic recounting of events leading up to that tragic day and projected forward with recommendations to prevent future attacks. >> every expert with whom we spoke told us an attack of even greater magnitude is now possible, and even probable. we do not have the luxury of time. we must prepare and we must act. >> brown: the 500 page report instantly became a best seller. it included 41 recommendations for federal, state and local governments and agencies. among them: the creation of a director of national intelligence to coordinate intelligence gathering as well as foreign and domestic operations; consolidated congressional oversight of homeland security and intelligence and streaml
an energy and commerce sub-committee. republican fred upton of michigan chairs the full committee. >> in this time of record debt, i question whether the government is qualified to act as a venture capitalist, picking winners and losers in speculative ventures and shelling out billions of taxpayer dollars to keep them afloat. >> suarez: a top official at the energy department jonathan silver said the green tech loan program is about more than just solyndra. >> this isn't picking winners and losers; it's helping ensure that we have winners here at all. we invented this technology and we should produce it here. the question is whether we are willing to take on this challenge or whether we will simply cede leadership in this vital sector to other nations and watch as tens of thousands of jobs are created overseas. >> suarez: but a report in today's "washington post" added fuel to the fire. it said internal e-mails from the office and management and budget showed concerns that the loans were granted too quickly. in one, an unidentified aide wrote: republican steve scalise of louisiana
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)